Implants

Implants 2017-11-13T01:38:28+00:00

DENTISTRY – Implants 

Implants are devices that replace the roots of missing teeth, and are used to support crowns, bridges or dentures. Implants are placed in your jawbone surgically. Most of the time, implants feel more natural and secure than other methods of replacing missing teeth, such as dentures. The key to the success of all implants is a process called osseointegration, in which the bone in the jaw bonds with the implant. Titanium is a special material that the jawbone accepts as part of the body.

Implants versus Alternatives
Since implants are imbedded in your bone, they feel more like your natural teeth than bridges or dentures. With implants you will not need to worry about denture adhesives or having your dentures slip, click or fall out when you speak,you will be able to chew better . Chewing can be difficult with regular dentures, especially ones that don’t fit perfectly. A regular upper denture also covers your palate, which can reduce your sense of taste. Because implants are so much like your natural teeth, you will think about them less. Your self-esteem and confidence will be improved because you will not have to worry about denture problems or people noticing that you have missing teeth. Regular dentures also can affect your speech, which can make you less self-confident when talking with others.

Who Is an Implant Candidate?

If you’re interested in replacing your missing teeth, or a single missing tooth, dental implants may be an option for you. Not everybody, however, is a good candidate for implants. A good candidate should have the following:

Good health
Healthy gums

Enough bone to anchor the implants in the jaw — Some people who have lost bone in their jaw still can get implants, but first the bone must be rebuilt using special procedures.
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Be committed to taking very good care of the implanted teeth and surrounding gums — Daily brushing and flossing are essential. Regular visits to the dentist for follow-up are also important.
Some people may not be good candidates for implants. They include:

Young patients whose jawbones have not developed completely

Pregnant women

Heavy smokers — Smoking impedes healing in the mouth and can reduce the likelihood that implants will be successful.

Alcohol or substance abusers

Patients who have received high-dose irradiation of their head or neck

People with chronic diseases or systemic problems, including high blood pressure, diabetes, connective-tissue diseases, hemophilia and significant immune deficiencies, among others — You still may be a good candidate for implants even if you have one of these conditions. It depends on the extent and severity of the condition. Patients who take certain medications such as steroids or drugs that suppress the immune system People who severely grind or clench their teeth — These habits can place too much pressure on the implants and increase the risk of failure. We evaluate you to see if you would be a good candidate to receive implants.

Implant therapy involves a team that includes the implantologist who places the implant or implants, and the restorative dentist who specializes in making crowns and bridges. The restorative dentist will make the crowns, bridges or dentures that will be supported by the implant or implants. The first step in your treatment is to make an appointment with the implant team.

Your initial evaluation will include an examination of your mouth and teeth and a thorough review of your medical and dental histories. You mouth will be X-rayed, and you might have a computed tomography (CT) scan, which will provide information on your bone density (how much bone you have in your jaw) and the shape of your jaw. Finally, you’ll discuss the options available to you with your dentist, talk about the procedure, and its cost and possible complications. We will work with you to develop a treatment plan that is customized to your particular needs and preferences.

The Implant Process

The time frame for completing the implant and crown depends on many factors. When the traditional method of placing an implant is used, the shortest time frame for a complete implant (including surgeries and placing the permanent crown) is about five months in the lower jaw and four months in the upper jaw. However, the process can last up to a year or more, particularly if bone needs to be built up first.

In the traditional method, two surgeries are required, with three to four months between them. During the first surgery, an incision is made in the gum where the implant will be placed. A hole is drilled in the bone, the implant is placed into the hole in the bone, and the incision is stitched closed.

At the end of the healing period, a second surgery takes place. It involves making a new incision to expose the implant. A collar, called an abutment, is screwed onto the top of the implant. The abutment is used to support the crown. A one-stage procedure is now used sometimes for implants. In this procedure, your dentist can place the implants, and place a temporary crown or bridge all in one visit. The time frame for this one-stage procedure, from placement to permanent restoration varies depending on the specific implant system being used. Sometimes, an abutment can’t be used. In that case, your dentist would attach the crown with a screw.
You care for your implants the same way you care for your natural teeth. It is important to brush and floss daily. You will need to visit your dentist every three months for checkups at first, but eventually you can have checkups every six months.

On an X-ray, you will be able to see the implant in the bone, the connection between the implant and the abutment, and the abutment and the crown. Your dentist can look at how the implant, abutment and crown fit together and make sure that there are no problems.

Single-Tooth Implants

Single-tooth implants can be used in people who are missing one or more teeth. An implant is surgically placed in your bone . After the implant integrates (attaches) to your bone, it acts as a new “root” for the crown that will be replacing your missing tooth. A crown (cap), which is made to look like a natural tooth, is attached to the implant and fills the space left in the mouth by the missing tooth. For this procedure to work, there must be enough bone in the jaw, and the bone has to be strong enough to hold and support the implant. If there is not enough bone, be may need to be added with a procedure called bone augmentation. If you need one of these procedures, it will take about 4 to 12 months for the bone to be ready for the implant. In addition, natural teeth and supporting tissues near where the implant will be placed must be in good health.

An implant-restored tooth consists of several parts.

The implant, which is made of titanium, is placed in the upper or lower jawbone.
The abutment can be made of titanium, gold or porcelain. It is attached to the implant with a screw. This part connects the implant to the crown.

The restoration (the part that looks like a tooth) is a crown, usually made of porcelain fused to a metal alloy (PFM or all-porcelain crown. The crown is attached either to the abutment or directly to the implant. It can be screwed or cemented onto the abutment.

Implant-Supported Denture

An implant-supported denture is a type of overdenture that is supported by and attached to implants. An implant-supported overdenture is attached to implants, while a regular denture rests on the gums, is not supported by implants, and tends to fit less firmly in the mouth

An implant-supported denture is used when a person doesn’t have any teeth in the jaw, but has enough bone in the jaw to support implants. An implant-supported denture has special attachments that snap onto attachments on the implants.

Implant-supported dentures usually are made for the lower jaw because regular dentures tend to be less stable there. Usually, a regular denture made to fit an upper jaw is quite stable on its own and doesn’t need the extra support offered by implants. However, you can receive an implant-supported denture in either the upper or lower jaw.

We will consider your particular needs and preferences when suggesting fixed or removable options. You can remove an implant-supported denture easily. You will need to remove the denture at least twice a day for cleaning. You also should carefully clean around the implants and attachments. Some people prefer to have fixed (permanent) crown and bridgework in their mouths that can’t be removed.

On an X-ray, you will be able to see the implant in the bone, the connection between the implant and the abutment, and the abutment and the crown. Your dentist can look at how the implant, abutment and crown fit together and make sure that there are no problems.

Single-Tooth Implants

Single-tooth implants can be used in people who are missing one or more teeth. An implant is surgically placed in your bone . After the implant integrates (attaches) to your bone, it acts as a new “root” for the crown that will be replacing your missing tooth. A crown (cap), which is made to look like a natural tooth, is attached to the implant and fills the space left in the mouth by the missing tooth. For this procedure to work, there must be enough bone in the jaw, and the bone has to be strong enough to hold and support the implant. If there is not enough bone, be may need to be added with a procedure called bone augmentation. If you need one of these procedures, it will take about 4 to 12 months for the bone to be ready for the implant. In addition, natural teeth and supporting tissues near where the implant will be placed must be in good health.

An implant-restored tooth consists of several parts.

The implant, which is made of titanium, is placed in the upper or lower jawbone.
The abutment can be made of titanium, gold or porcelain. It is attached to the implant with a screw. This part connects the implant to the crown.

The restoration (the part that looks like a tooth) is a crown, usually made of porcelain fused to a metal alloy (PFM or all-porcelain crown. The crown is attached either to the abutment or directly to the implant. It can be screwed or cemented onto the abutment.

Implant-Supported Denture

An implant-supported denture is a type of overdenture that is supported by and attached to implants. An implant-supported overdenture is attached to implants, while a regular denture rests on the gums, is not supported by implants, and tends to fit less firmly in the mouth

An implant-supported denture is used when a person doesn’t have any teeth in the jaw, but has enough bone in the jaw to support implants. An implant-supported denture has special attachments that snap onto attachments on the implants.

Implant-supported dentures usually are made for the lower jaw because regular dentures tend to be less stable there. Usually, a regular denture made to fit an upper jaw is quite stable on its own and doesn’t need the extra support offered by implants. However, you can receive an implant-supported denture in either the upper or lower jaw.

We will consider your particular needs and preferences when suggesting fixed or removable options. You can remove an implant-supported denture easily. You will need to remove the denture at least twice a day for cleaning. You also should carefully clean around the implants and attachments. Some people prefer to have fixed (permanent) crown and bridgework in their mouths that can’t be removed.